+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,170

    Default Challenging scientific "dogma". Your thoughts?

    Putting some of the more odd things aside, what do you think about them changing the units for measuring the speed of light, etc?



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ter...U1bPaQ&index=1
    Last edited by Sillywilly; 08-06-2017 at 07:08 PM.
    "Nah man, a Paladin has to play fair and by the rules. Do you really see Silly not attacking a weakened opponent? Or rather, not exploiting a weakness to take an enemy down? He'd totally do that. It's the law of the jungle with Silly, even if he does have faith. I think he's principled, just not merciful." - Zavon

  2. #2

    Default Re: Challenging scientific "dogma". Your thoughts?

    Opened video.

    Googled Sheldrake's name. Literally believes everything, from plants and animals and humans down to molecules, share a psychic memory. Self describes as a parasychologist.

    Googled TEDx's reason for removing him. Immediately given examples of completely false statements made by Sheldrake, and comments show his supporters citing DOG TELEPATHY as backup for his validity.

    Tried to watch video anyway.

    "The science delusion is the belief that science already understands the nature of reality... belief system in science... etc etc... "
    Stretching a bit here. There are always people who take things too far, trust too easily or overvalue sources. Having "faith" in science is no exception... but he's playing it up way too much. He's creating doubt so he can take a giant shit and pretend it doesn't stink.

    "...physical materialism..."
    Google... "Materialism is a form of philosophical monism which holds that matter is the fundamental substance in nature, and that all things, including mental things and consciousness, are results of material interactions. Materialism is closely related to physicalism, the view that all that exists is ultimately physical"
    Science didn't collectively decide to be based around this, that's just all there was to apply the scientific method to. The success and widespread application of quantum physics proves that it is not limited by physical materialsim, though common sense should already be sufficient to do that. Again, sounds like he's dropped trou and squatting to take a big shit and pretend it doesn't stink...


    "I take the 10 dogmas or assumptions of science, and turn them into questions"
    Google... And there's the giant shit. No one uses these as dogmas except him. They are all horseshit and he argues with no one but himself as he answers them. He's invented a wedge to create doubt, that he can fill with woo-woo. This guy is like an English Depak Chopra.

    "... and I'll only have time to discuss one or two of them..."
    VK is unable to pretend the shit doesn't stink and loses interest at about the 2:00min mark.




    EDIT
    To discuss I would say that, if anything, I think we've gone too far from physical materialism. I'm not a fan of this notion that quantum physics is basically paranormal. I like this guy's idea of quantized space. It seems to fit and does not require woo-woo.

    Obviously I acknowledge that this is way over my head though, it's like cheering for a sports team of a sport that I've never played. He could just be better than Sheldrake at bullshitting the uneducated.

    Last edited by VKhaun; 08-06-2017 at 09:26 PM.
    Nowadays when people start to get killed by fireballs, no one says they need to dodge the fireball anymore; they say they need to go get a fire resist ring and some ice damage so they don't have to.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,170

    Default Re: Challenging scientific "dogma". Your thoughts?

    Yeah some of his stuff is crackpottish. I did find it interesting though, assuming it's true, that the universes "constants" may not be constant at all and that modern science is ignoring this possibility. (or the facts proving it).

    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...tant-after-all

    https://www.newscientist.com/article...e-its-serious/
    Last edited by Sillywilly; 08-10-2017 at 05:46 PM.
    "Nah man, a Paladin has to play fair and by the rules. Do you really see Silly not attacking a weakened opponent? Or rather, not exploiting a weakness to take an enemy down? He'd totally do that. It's the law of the jungle with Silly, even if he does have faith. I think he's principled, just not merciful." - Zavon

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    3,320

    Default Re: Challenging scientific "dogma". Your thoughts?

    I don't know anything about this dude or his paraphysics, but I 100% believe that if you want spiritual answers of any sort physics is where you will get it. Dark Matter, for instance, is a source of matter that is all around us, is the only way our universe makes any sense at all, and yet is completely unobservable by any method that we have devised. All of the "normal" matter in the observable universe makes up only about 5%. 86% is dark matter and dark energy-- which is just fucking crazy imo. If you wanted to make a case for another world or worlds co-existing on top of ours but untouchable, unobservable I'd be willing to at least say that I could entertain the notion.
    "Doubt is not an agreeable condition, but certainty is an absurd one." ~ Voltaire

    2 Kings 2:23-24: "....Then two bears came out of the woods and mauled forty-two of the boys."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,170

    Default Re: Challenging scientific "dogma". Your thoughts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zavon View Post
    I don't know anything about this dude or his paraphysics, but I 100% believe that if you want spiritual answers of any sort physics is where you will get it. Dark Matter, for instance, is a source of matter that is all around us, is the only way our universe makes any sense at all, and yet is completely unobservable by any method that we have devised. All of the "normal" matter in the observable universe makes up only about 5%. 86% is dark matter and dark energy-- which is just fucking crazy imo. If you wanted to make a case for another world or worlds co-existing on top of ours but untouchable, unobservable I'd be willing to at least say that I could entertain the notion.
    Yeah I think that's kind of the gist of what he was getting at. I think he's saying that gravity and radiation and light would have all been considered paranormal at some time until we devised the instruments to measure and better understand them and that some of these other unexplainable phenomenon could also fall into that realm. If he means to say that there is enough evidence out there for "weird shit" that they warrant a second look to see if perhaps they can be scientifically measurable then I think it's kind of a cool notion. Until we can start setting foot on other planets/etc then those things would be fairly inexpensive and interesting things to explore that could potentially have huge implications if they did turn out to be somewhat true.
    "Nah man, a Paladin has to play fair and by the rules. Do you really see Silly not attacking a weakened opponent? Or rather, not exploiting a weakness to take an enemy down? He'd totally do that. It's the law of the jungle with Silly, even if he does have faith. I think he's principled, just not merciful." - Zavon

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    3,320

    Default Re: Challenging scientific "dogma". Your thoughts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sillywilly View Post
    Yeah I think that's kind of the gist of what he was getting at. I think he's saying that gravity and radiation and light would have all been considered paranormal at some time until we devised the instruments to measure and better understand them and that some of these other unexplainable phenomenon could also fall into that realm. If he means to say that there is enough evidence out there for "weird shit" that they warrant a second look to see if perhaps they can be scientifically measurable then I think it's kind of a cool notion. Until we can start setting foot on other planets/etc then those things would be fairly inexpensive and interesting things to explore that could potentially have huge implications if they did turn out to be somewhat true.
    What I think is interesting is that we don't even need to go to other planets. I mean that is sort of the dream to find alien life or what have you, but there is shit all around us right now. Just hidden from our ability to perceive it.
    "Doubt is not an agreeable condition, but certainty is an absurd one." ~ Voltaire

    2 Kings 2:23-24: "....Then two bears came out of the woods and mauled forty-two of the boys."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,170

    Default Re: Challenging scientific "dogma". Your thoughts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zavon View Post
    What I think is interesting is that we don't even need to go to other planets. I mean that is sort of the dream to find alien life or what have you, but there is shit all around us right now. Just hidden from our ability to perceive it.
    I'm on a tangent here but:

    I've always wondered why we aren't trying to spend more resources to try and get a probe out into deep space to search for life.

    I decided to look at some figures and ended up being curious how close the nearest galaxy (not to be confused with solar system) is. The closest galaxy to ours is Andromeda. It's 2.5 million light years away. It takes LIGHT, 2. fucking 5 million years to travel from Andromeda to Earth. Light travels at 671 million miles per hour. So the nearest galaxy is 5.87796e+12 miles per year x 2.5 million years. Utterly ridiculous.

    However it's a neat concept, although you'd be so far away that you'd get no detail, somewhere out there, in theory, if you could travel faster than the speed of light, or go through a wormhole, you could get ahead of the light that left earth back when it was just forming, and basically see earth's history from day 1 forward. (since light never stops traveling unless it hits another medium or absorbs another medium) I guess also if you were to fly back directly into that light at 9 times the speed of light you could watch the earth form/etc in 10x fast forward speed.

    Also planet Proxima B is 4.2 light years away from us. Making it the closest "goldilocks" planet in theory. I can't even figure how many miles that is, it's 2.4687432e+13. Whatever the hell that is. Our fastest probe went 165,000 (Juno) miles per hour after being sling shot around Jupitar. That's .0004066 of the speed of light. Light travels 16,104,000,000 miles per day. 16 freaking trillion miles. So 16 trillion miles times 365 days per year, at 4.2 years is = 2.336e+13. Again, WTF ever that means.

    Anyways long story short, our fastest probe would take 17,080 years to reach that planet. (checking my math: 167,000,000 / Junos speed of 165k miles per hour = 4066.6666. Light is 4066 times faster than our fastest probe. So 4.2 years worth of light travel = 17,080 years worth of travel by our fastest space probe so far. Mankind will literally NEVER visit Proxima B by travel. And theoretically it's the CLOSEST habitable planet. It'll require bending space or it will never happen. Like literally we have no hope of exploring space outside our solar system unless we start doing some Star Wars shit. Which basically equates to magic in the "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”" Author C Clark context.

    I find that quite depressing. One of my greatest wishes would be to see another planet from another solar system that has liquid water. That's it. I just want to see an actual image or video of the surface of a planet that is in the goldilocks zone.
    Last edited by Sillywilly; 08-11-2017 at 12:52 AM.
    "Nah man, a Paladin has to play fair and by the rules. Do you really see Silly not attacking a weakened opponent? Or rather, not exploiting a weakness to take an enemy down? He'd totally do that. It's the law of the jungle with Silly, even if he does have faith. I think he's principled, just not merciful." - Zavon

  8. #8

    Default Re: Challenging scientific "dogma". Your thoughts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sillywilly View Post
    I'm on a tangent here but:

    I've always wondered why we aren't trying to spend more resources to try and get a probe out into deep space to search for life.

    I decided to look at some figures and ended up being curious how close the nearest galaxy (not to be confused with solar system) is. The closest galaxy to ours is Andromeda. It's 2.5 million light years away. It takes LIGHT, 2. fucking 5 million years to travel from Andromeda to Earth. Light travels at 671 million miles per hour. So the nearest galaxy is 5.87796e+12 miles per year x 2.5 million years. Utterly ridiculous.

    However it's a neat concept, although you'd be so far away that you'd get no detail, somewhere out there, in theory, if you could travel faster than the speed of light, or go through a wormhole, you could get ahead of the light that left earth back when it was just forming, and basically see earth's history from day 1 forward. (since light never stops traveling unless it hits another medium or absorbs another medium) I guess also if you were to fly back directly into that light at 9 times the speed of light you could watch the earth form/etc in 10x fast forward speed.

    Also planet Proxima B is 4.2 light years away from us. Making it the closest "goldilocks" planet in theory. I can't even figure how many miles that is, it's 2.4687432e+13. Whatever the hell that is. Our fastest probe went 165,000 (Juno) miles per hour after being sling shot around Jupitar. That's .0004066 of the speed of light. Light travels 16,104,000,000 miles per day. 16 freaking trillion miles. So 16 trillion miles times 365 days per year, at 4.2 years is = 2.336e+13. Again, WTF ever that means.

    Anyways long story short, our fastest probe would take 17,080 years to reach that planet. (checking my math: 167,000,000 / Junos speed of 165k miles per hour = 4066.6666. Light is 4066 times faster than our fastest probe. So 4.2 years worth of light travel = 17,080 years worth of travel by our fastest space probe so far. Mankind will literally NEVER visit Proxima B by travel. And theoretically it's the CLOSEST habitable planet. It'll require bending space or it will never happen. Like literally we have no hope of exploring space outside our solar system unless we start doing some Star Wars shit. Which basically equates to magic in the "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”" Author C Clark context.

    I find that quite depressing. One of my greatest wishes would be to see another planet from another solar system that has liquid water. That's it. I just want to see an actual image or video of the surface of a planet that is in the goldilocks zone.
    Nuclear pulse engine technology has been around for a long time (See Orion) and could get something (IIRC) to around .1 the speed of light. It only hasn't been done because people are nuclear pussies and that test-ban treaty. @ .1 the speed of light reaching the nearest Goldilocks planet looks much more achievable. So, napkin math, that would take what? 42 years, give or take a few? I think that's more realistic for a deep space probe. I wonder what the time dilation effect would be at say 12% the speed of light. That alone would be an interesting experiment that could be carried out concurrently. If these bitches had started the shit when it was first possible, we'd be there already.
    "The argument that “people now have more freedom than ever” is based on the fact that we are allowed to do almost anything we please as long as it has no practical consequences."

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    3,170

    Default Re: Challenging scientific "dogma". Your thoughts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Marou View Post
    Nuclear pulse engine technology has been around for a long time (See Orion) and could get something (IIRC) to around .1 the speed of light. It only hasn't been done because people are nuclear pussies and that test-ban treaty. @ .1 the speed of light reaching the nearest Goldilocks planet looks much more achievable. So, napkin math, that would take what? 42 years, give or take a few? I think that's more realistic for a deep space probe. I wonder what the time dilation effect would be at say 12% the speed of light. That alone would be an interesting experiment that could be carried out concurrently. If these bitches had started the shit when it was first possible, we'd be there already.
    42 years would definitely be worth it. Some people would still be alive to see the results. I'd be pushing it but I'd do an extra day a week at the gym and take my vitamins for the potential to be around and see the pictures that came back. Man would that be so awesome to send a probe down on Proxima B.
    "Nah man, a Paladin has to play fair and by the rules. Do you really see Silly not attacking a weakened opponent? Or rather, not exploiting a weakness to take an enemy down? He'd totally do that. It's the law of the jungle with Silly, even if he does have faith. I think he's principled, just not merciful." - Zavon

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts